ANTH 5210F –Special Topics in Indigenous Studies: Decolonizing the Anthropocene

Urbane Adventurer: Amiskwacî

I’m teaching a fall term graduate seminar on ‘Decolonizing the Anthropocene’. The Anthropocene Working Group (AWG) will be determining the terms and conditions (including determining the start date) of the Anthropocene this year. The term has become what anthropologist Beth Reddy calls a ‘charismatic mega-category’, which sweeps up within it diverse and dynamic discourses on human-environmental relations, socio-political orders, economics, ecology, post-humanism, decolonization, anti-colonization, white supremacy, imperialism, science, geology, philosophy and a host of other nodes of thought and action.

The goal of this course is to explore the scientific narratives of the Anthropocene, as framed by organizations such as the AWG, and encourage students to apply critical thinking skills in analyzing the context through which the Anthropocene is being constructed across…

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Daniels Public Lecture: Zoe Todd

Urbane Adventurer: Amiskwacî

This March I was very thrilled to give a public lecture at the Daniels School of Architecture at the University of Toronto. The talk was part of the Master of Visual Studies Proseminar Series organized generously by Charles Stankievech.

Abstract (from the Youtube video): “”Fish pluralities, refraction and decolonization in amiskwaciwâskahikan” at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design.

In a recent piece (Todd 2014), Zoe Todd examined what it means to expand ‘reconciliation’ discourses in Canada ‘beyond-the-human’,incorporating human-fish relations into broader conversations about Indigenous-State relations and settler-colonial realities. This talk examined the possibilities and potentials offered to us as we heed Anishinaabe legal scholar John Borrows’ call to acknowledge Indigenous legal orders within the legal pluralities that shape Canada (Pohlmann 2014). Taking the intimate and fleshy relationships between humans and fish in Zoe’s hometown of Edmonton as a departure point, she examines how we can shift…

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News

Very excited to share the news that, as of  01 July, I will be starting a preliminary tenure-track position as a lecturer in the department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University.

Also, I was very honoured to be invited to participate in the ‘World of Matter’ event at Concordia University in February 2015. You can watch the entire two day symposium online, and my talk is archived here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1IX10w5xEw&feature=youtu.be&t=6h19m30s

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I am pursuing a PhD in Social Anthropology at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. My work currently focuses on the relationships between people, fish and the environment in the Western Canadian Arctic in the past and present, in the context of environmental change. Using fishing as a lens, I employ a historical ethnographic approach to understand how human-environmental relationships in the Western Canadian Arctic have been shaped by various factors — including colonialism — over the last one hundred years.

Throughout 2012, I conducted ten months of ethnographic work in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, which included interviews with various community members and extensive fishing trips through the spring, summer and fall. I have also conducted archival work in the Hudson’s Bay Archives (Winnipeg), Provincial Archives of Alberta (Edmonton) and Library and Archives Canada (Ottawa) in order to contextualize both Inuvialuit and non-Inuvialuit discourses of fish and fishing in the region.

My PhD research employs a detailed local case study in order to illustrate the various ways that fish, fishing and water are framed and experienced by various actors in the North. This case study can inform our understanding of future impacts from resource development and environmental change in the Canadian Arctic.

At a broader scale, I am particularly interested in people’s relationships to the environment, and how these are articulated in resource management, wildlife management and urban planning frameworks. As a Metis woman, I am also interested in how Indigenous narratives are framed and mobilized in relation to resource management and urban planning discourses in Canada.

Please feel free to peruse the pages of this site to learn more about my academic and social advocacy/community-based work.